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Governor vetoes “Good Neighbor” Bill

 


OKLAHOMA CITY — Now that tornado season is here, there is something timely happening at the State Capitol.

The idea is to drop any liability for operators of mobile home parks if they let residents take shelter inside the main office building when a storm is baring down.

The idea is not to require anything but instead take away any fear the operators have about being sued.

Back in March, House Bill 2296 passed through both the house and senate with only one person voting no.

On Friday the Governor Mary Fallin vetoed it saying the bill does not encourage mobile home park owners to provide a safe environment for residents.

Gov. Fallin’s spokesman, Alex Weintz, said, “The problem with the legislation that came to the Governor’s desk is that, in some cases, we felt it actually set the stage for a less safe environment in mobile home parks.”

Representative Eric Proctor (Tulsa – D) is one of the authors of the bi-partisan bill and said, “It’s really just a Good Samaritan law. It says if you are willing to do the right thing, if you are willing to love your neighbor and allow them to come into your office, we want to make sure you are protected. We don’t want to punish people for doing the right thing. I respectfully disagree with the governor that that decision (to veto) wasn’t the right one. I was really disappointed because I feel this bill has the potential to save lives.”

Rep. Proctor brought the bill back before the house Monday to try to over-ride the governor’s veto and get the bill back on its way to becoming law.

After some discussion about the governor’s move, lawmakers put it on hold.