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Vet treating cat rescued from meth house


CATOOSA, Okla. — A dramatic look at what “meth” can do. In this case, we’re not talking about a person abusing the drug, rather a family pet exposed to toxic chemicals.

When Wagoner County deputies shut down a meth lab in Catoosa last week, they found more than a dozen cats inside the home including one animal now recovering from a life of neglect.

This gray and white cat has no name, no home and is in very poor health.

Hopefully he’ll be alright.

We don’t know for sure yet.

He was taken from this home in Catoosa last week where deputies seized 30 one-pot meth labs and drugs.

Terry Young and Kristi Le Maner were arrested on drug and animal cruelty complaints.

Of the several cats inside, only this one allowed deputies to get close.

Veterinarian Dr. Bob Shoup took him in and is now dedicated to getting him healthy.

“This cat was real weak, depressed and lethargic and not moving around so much,” Dr. Shoup said.

For now he’s simply called “meth cat.”

After a bath and checkup, Dr. Shoup was asked to conduct a drug test where the cat tested positive for meth.

“How many times have you tested a cat for meth? One! This is the only one we’ve ever done,” he said.

Dr. Shoup said the cat’s exposure was secondary, meaning he wasn’t given the drug; a cat wouldn’t survive that type of exposure.

The cat’s biggest health issue now, his teeth.

Dr. Shoup said animal neglect and a poor diet caused horrific infections.

“We grade cats’ teeth here one through five. His teeth are absolutely horrible. I’d grade them almost a 10,” Dr. Shoup said.

For now, they’re building up his nutrition and giving him much-needed T.L.C.

The lab tests had to be done at Texas A&M University, the closest location for feline drug testing.

The vet said the cat will need some dental surgeries and more monitoring but should make a suitable pet in the future.

They’ve already had several calls from families wanting to adopt the cat.