Programming Change: Days of Our Lives to air at 2 a.m.

If you can see this, it’s not the apocalypse

Will December 21, 2012 bring the end of the world or just another Friday?

Friday morning the ancient Mayan calendar runs out. (If you’re reading this Friday morning, the apocalypse didn’t happen.). 

For years that’s led some to forecast Dec. 21 as the day of the apocalypse.

The day does mark the end of the 5,000-year-old Mayan long count calendar, but tales of the end times will likely prove to be bogus once again.

“I don’t want people to be scared, living in a cave, but I do want people to use wisdom,” said Gaylon Cornsilk.

Gaylon runs a store in Midwest City called Red Dawn.

The store sells nonperishable food, emergency packs and survival guides.

If doomsday ever does come, Gaylon will be ready.

Yet even he doesn’t believe December 2012 will bring with it the end of the world.

“I’m not worried about the Mayan calendar. We’re gonna be here. We’re gonna be open. I’m not worried about that,” said Gaylon.

Three years ago, Hollywood used the possibility of global catastrophe with the expiration of the Mayan calendar to sell tickets, but the movie 2012 is hardly the first end of the world prediction.

Last year billboards and buses blanketed the country after Harold Camping predicted the rapture.

That prediction also turned out to be false, for good reason.

“We just should not be predicting these things,” said Oklahoma Christian University professor Stafford North. “We shouldn’t be guessing about it, because we don’t know.”

North says the Bible does predict the end of the world, but singling out an exact date is impossible.

“The most frequent thing the bible says about the end of the world is it’ll come like a thief in the night and thieves don’t tell you when they’re coming,” said North.