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Stress caused by Valentine’s Day?

valentines

NEW YORK—A lot of couples are scrambling to figure out what to do on Valentine’s Day this year.

However, a new study shows that the pressure surrounding the holiday is taking a toll on couples.

A recent study followed 2,000 people and found that nearly 65 percent of people feel some sort of pressure to celebrate Feb. 14.

Dr. Kristen Mark, PhD and director of the survey, said “This survey was designed to put Valentine’s Day under the microscope and go beyond the chocolate and flowers to find out how people, both in and out of relationships, really feel about it. Respondents were asked about, among other things, their attitudes toward the holiday, gift-giving intentions, expectations in the bedroom and plans, or lack thereof, to celebrate.”

Experts found that 56 percent of people surveyed plan to celebrate and look forward to the day.

However, that compares to 65 percent of people who feel pressure to celebrate and 50 percent of people who feel pressure to have sex.

In addition to the couples surveyed, 40 percent of singles think it is important to not be alone on Valentine’s Day.

Experts suggest looking forward to the day by connecting with your partner.

They say start by sharing a hug that lasts at least 30 seconds or sending a sweet text to show your spouse how you feel about them.

Also, make sure you communicate, even if you are not discussing something Earth-shattering. Simple conversation can help the night move along.

Experts also say you shouldn’t overschedule your Valentine’s Day. Pick something simple that will keep you and your partner entertained, without leaving you exhausted at the end of the night.

Finally, don’t spend a fortune. Simple gifts are sometimes the best option while you’re recovering from the holiday spending splurge.

If you are single this Feb. 14, relationship experts suggest spending the day working on your relationships with friends.