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Storm victims in familiar battle with insurance companies


We all expect insurance to help us get back to where we were before a disaster. But dozens of victims of May’s tornadoes say that’s not happening and they’ve turned to an attorney who’s gotten million dollar judgments against insurance companies before.

In fact, just recently, from cases settled after the Woodward tornado. Jeff Marr won a large class action lawsuit against State Farm after the May 3rd, 1999 tornado.

One of his clients was Donna Cosper. Her home was again hit this past May, both on the 20th and the 31st and she says a different insurance company is giving them the run around.

“He just stared right at it and said he didn’t see a thing wrong,” said Cosper.

Despite bowed walls and cabinets and cracked sheet rock, Cosper says her insurance adjuster told her all she needed was a new roof.

“The roofer from their company said I can’t put a roof on this house. It’s not structurally sound,” said Cosper.

“I was surprised that it happened again so quick,” said Marr.

Marr says he’s already signed up about 35 different clients from this past May’s tornadoes.

“Same exact repeat performance of what we saw on May 3rd, what we saw in Picher, what we’ve seen in Woodward. I mean every time a catastrophe comes, it seems to be the same way,” said Marr.

Clients like the Misners, who say their insurance company wanted them to move back into their home as soon as the power came back on, despite holes in the ceiling.

“That’s why we pay insurance, is to be taken care of in case of something like this happens,” said Tim Misner.

And single mom, Alicia Stone, who bought her home just one month before the storm. She now says her insurance company is offering $25,000 less than she paid.

“I’m not asking for the insurance company to build me a bigger house. I just want what we had back,” said Stone. “The stress of trying to deal with the insurance company has been worse than the tornado.”