Live Radar: Follow the storms moving across Oklahoma

Allergy season in full force, doctors warn against ‘questionable’ remedies


OKLAHOMA CITY – Sniffling, sneezing, itching, it’s allergy season. Ragweed is one plant at its highest peak right now, causing a lot of suffering for people in Oklahoma.

Many across the state are feeling the effects of weeds, mold and pollen.

“Itchy nose, eyes, watery nose, sneezing,” Barber said.

When we ran into Stan Barber at Lake Hefner, he had just taken a Claritin, an over-the-counter drug that temporarily eases the symptoms, but is certainly no cure.

“When I’m off and want to be out and about like I am now and I’m feeling really bad, that puts a big damper on my day,” Barber said.

A ragweed plant has the potential to produce a billion of spores of pollen which in return can cause a lot of misery for allergy sufferers.

“Hang in there, it could be a tough season,” Chong said.

Many remedies are available such as nasal sprays, injections and medications.

Lifestyle changes help too, like keeping windows closed or taking a shower as soon as you get home from a day outside.

However, there are some questionable home remedies out there.

We heard of one that might make your skin crawl; letting hookworms burrow into your skin.

The remedy from Europe is geared to manipulate the immune system in a way that eliminates allergies but doctors aren’t so sure.

“We see it as therapy that’s experimental and not really understood or studied,” Chong said.

Dr. Chong has also heard people using honey to get rid of allergies or eating fatty acids like omega 3s.

Again, neither of these treatments are clinically proven.

For Barber, his plan is to continue to take medicines like Claritin, Allegra and Benadryl for the rest of the season.

“Just prepare for it and hopefully I don’t suffer as much this year,” Barber said.

The allergy season lasts for quite some time; those with allergies can be prepared to feel the effects up until the first frost.