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Binge drinking is a serious, under-recognized problem among women and girls

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According to the Centers for Disease Control, 1 in 8, nearly 14 million, US women binge drink about three times a month. Women average six drinks per binge.

1 in 5 high school girls binge drink.

Binge drinking is a dangerous behavior but is not widely recognized as a women’s health problem.

Drinking too much – including binge drinking – results in about 23,000 deaths in women and girls each year.

Binge drinking increases the chances of breast cancer, heart disease, sexually transmitted diseases, unintended pregnancy, and many other health problems.

Drinking during pregnancy can lead to sudden infant death syndrome and fetal alcohol spectrum disorders.

About 1 in 8 women aged 18 years and older and 1 in 5 high school girls binge drink.

Women who binge drink do so frequently – about three times a month – and have about six drinks per binge.

There are effective actions communities can take to prevent binge drinking among women and girls.

Binge drinking for women is defined as consuming four or more alcoholic drinks (beer, wine, or liquor) on an occasion.

Drinking too much can seriously affect the health of women and girls.

Women’s and girls’ bodies respond to alcohol differently than men’s. It takes less alcohol for women to get intoxicated because of their size and how they process alcohol.

Binge drinking can lead to unintended pregnancies. It is not safe to drink at any time during pregnancy.

If women binge drink while pregnant, they risk exposing their developing baby to high levels of alcohol, increasing the chances the baby will be harmed by the mother’s alcohol use.

Drinking is influenced by your community and your relationships.

Alcohol use in a community is affected by alcohol’s price and availability.

Underage drinking is affected by exposure to alcohol marketing. Underage drinking is also influenced by adult drinking, and youth often obtain alcohol from adults.