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Consumers rushing for last of incandescent bulbs

incandescent

OKLAHOMA – The government is shedding light on the amount of energy you use with you light bulbs with a law prohibiting production of the traditional incandescent bulb called the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007.

“The upfront cost is quite a bit, but the overall savings will be wonderful and using less electricity will be great too,” Randy Foster, electrical associate at Home Depot in OKC said.

Incandescent bulbs give off more heat than light, so the Energy Department is hoping consumers will pick a more Eco-friendly option. That includes halogens, fluorescent or LED.

The alternatives use 75% less energy than the traditional incandescent, but some still aren’t ready to switch from their favorite light bulb.

“You know, change is not an easy thing. Everybody likes the old 100s, the old 75s, 60s and 40s. Starting January 1 our store shelves was pretty much going empty of the incandescent,” Foster said.

And while companies have stopped manufacturing the incandescent light bulbs, don’t panic. That doesn’t mean you’re not going to be able to find them on store shelves.

“In the past 3 days we’ve had a massive people coming in thinking that as of January 1 we’re going to do away completely with the 40s and 60s on the shelves,”  Foster said.

“That’s not true. The warehouses will still have that.”

Foster estimates it will take about a year for the stock to completely run out in stores, but he contends you won’t even see a difference by making the switch.

“They have same exact base. We have the candelabra bas,” Foster said.

“We have the LEDs for that. We have the CFLs for that and the regular base. They’re all exactly the same.”

For the same amount of light, the Energy Department says you will spend $4.80 a year on the incandescent bulb versus $1 for an LED light bulb and $1.20 for a fluorescent bulb.