In Your Corner: Elderly couple can’t shake dispute

EDMOND, OKLA. – Millie Young is a polio survivor and continues to suffer from a neurological disorder.

The last thing she needs right now is more stress.

“We’re getting up in age where we don’t need things tormenting us and aggravating us,” she said.

She and her husband, Glen, get by fine, but they’re on a fixed income.

Three years ago they signed an agreement with U.S. Alert Security to monitor their home’s security system.

Well, that contract was supposed to expire earlier this year.

Instead U.S. Alert tacked on another year of service and more charges because of something etched out in their contract.

The only way they can only get out of their agreement is if they submit a written cancellation notice to U.S. Alert at least 90 days prior to their contract expiring.

Millie said, “I didn’t contact them by letter, written form, they could continue to charge me for a year.”

Here’s the thing, the couple doesn’t even live at the home where the alarm system is installed.

They moved late last year.

Millie says she tried calling U.S. Alert to cancel the service, but that wasn’t good enough.

U.S. Alert’s owner, Jeremy Young, claims Glen and Millie were well aware of the terms of their contract.

He goes onto say while he believes their “…agreement to be valid and enforceable,” he’s decided to waive the Young’s balance after all.

Millie now has one less worry on her plate.

The In Your Corner bottom line:

  • Most times you’re bound by whatever is written in a contract.
  • Service contracts typically include extensive terms and conditions.
  • It makes sense to read every line before you sign.

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