Baby mink sends Oklahoma sanctuary on hunt for mice

NOBLE, Okla. — An Oklahoma animal sanctuary is asking for help paying for thousands of mice to feed animals in need.

Secretive and nocturnal, minks are native to Oklahoma but rarely in the spotlight.

Wild Care Animal Sanctuary rescued a mink last month, which is only the third time they’ve nursed a mink back to health at their Noble facility.

Already, the little mink has eaten through his body weight in mice.

Mice are a staple for the mink, along with many of the other 800 animals at Wild Care.

“We go through 700 mice and 100 jumbo rats in a week here for food for these animals,” said Operational Director Rondi Large. “It costs us almost $1,000 per week for these guys to have lunch.”

Interns, like Bernadette Brady, bring home the bacon for baby barn owls and vultures, which eat three times a day on site.

“This year’s kids are still eating mice, and soon they’ll start eating rats,” Brady said. “When they were young, they were taking little tiny pieces, and now they’re maturing and eating full mice. They’re moving along really, really well. So, it’s very rewarding and you stop thinking about the mice and how gross they are.”

The staff is rehabilitating a golden eagle, which eats two large rats a day.

The rats cost $4 each, which adds up to $8 a day to feed one bird.

“Eighty¬†cents a mouse isn’t that bad, but the quantities we go through. Last year, I accepted 5,280 animals. So that’s a lot of mouse munchers,” Large said.

So far, Wild Care has spent $25,000 on mice and rats.

Wild Care is encouraging supporters to feed the birds financially, not literally, by donating to the ‘Munch a Mouse on Monday’ fund.