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School board makes decision regarding local superintendent’s employment

NOBLE, Okla. - School board members in Noble made their decision regarding the superintendent’s employment Tuesday night.

In a 3 to 1 vote, board members decided Ronda Bass could keep her job as superintendent.

The board had called a special meeting to discuss Bass’ employment after many angry calls from parents over the way Bass had enforced the dress code at the beginning of the school year.

They say Bass referred to some of the girls as ‘skanks’ and made them bend over to see if their skirts and shorts were too short.

The board members voted to develop a professional development plan for Bass.

“To insinuate that going to some sort of training is going to fix all this is just crazy,” said Jennifer Fourcade.

Fourcade says her daughter was singled out the second day of school, taken in the hallway by superintendent Bass and told to bend over.

“She’s showing her staff that you can pull girls out in the hallway, tell them to bend over and touch their toes and inspect their buttocks, she thinks that ok,” said Fourcade.

More than 100 people showed up to the board meeting, even though all discussion took place in private, in executive session.

Some of the parents who showed up were there in support of the superintendent.

“She had the guts enough to step up to the plate to enforce that dress code,” said Sandy Cole.

“I believe that we needed to tighten up the dress code. It is written. It is written policy. And she was going after it, just like she should,” said Renee Hailey.

Superintendent Bass spoke to us a week and a half ago and defended her way of enforcing the dress code.

“If you’re not comfortable with bending over, we might have a problem,” said Bass.

“If my boss came in and told me that I was dressed like a skank, to bend over, touch my toes while he looked at my buttocks, I don’t think they’d be sending him to professional development,” said Fourcade.

Fourcade and several other parents have hired an attorney and they say the fight’s not over.

“We want her out of this school system completely,” said Fourcade.

School board members would not elaborate on their decision or what exactly they meant by a professional development plan.

Fourcade says they’ll begin at the district level and follow all grievance procedures, but did not rule out the possibility of a lawsuit.