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Family discovers new home is their ‘worst nightmare’

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GRAND RAPIDS, Mich. (WXMI) - When you buy a home, most people are excited for the future.

However, a couple in Michigan says after they regret ever purchasing their home in Grand Rapids.

Heather and Brian Vanorder say they were looking forward to being closer to family.

They purchased a home and moved in about a month ago.

Shortly after moving in, a man living in the upstairs unit of their duplex began to tell them about the previous owner.

"He was 100 percent sure they cooked meth in there, and that he helped the seller cover it up," Heather Vanorder said.

The former upstairs tenant admitted to helping the previous owner renovate the kitchen and bedroom to cover up the drug activity.

"We bought a meth house," said Heather. "I don't even have words anymore."

Heather has a history of multiple sclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis and is fearful the chemicals will damage her family's health.

"It's scary and I don't want to live in fear or be sick," she said.

The Vanorders had two separate tests done in the kitchen and bedroom to detect chemical levels.

Both tests showed levels of methamphetamine much higher than what the Environmental Protection Agency allows.

"You see it in the movies. You watch 'Breaking bad,' but you get into a house with it, it's like, what do I do?" asked Brian Vanorder.

The couple is now forced to live out of their moving boxes, afraid of contaminating their possessions with the chemicals that still linger.

Contractors say walls need to be torn out and furniture should be replaced in order to make the home safe.

The cost is expected be around $20,000.

In Michigan, there is not a law that requires a seller to disclose former drug activity or other crimes when listing a home. In the seller's disclosure, it asks for information on "environmental contamination," but the rule is easily sidestepped.

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