Great State: Norman Jewelry Maker Knows Big and Small of Metallurgy

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NORMAN, OKLAHOMA -- Life size and larger.

As chief mold maker at the Crucible Foundry in Norman Tomoaki Orikasa often works on a heroic scale.

The thin layer of wax he applies to rubber molds will be replaced by heavy bronze in the end.

Many of the pieces both inside the gallery and outside are of his creation.

The bronzes are part of a complicated process that requires time and collaboration.

But there is another side to Tom as well, the side that drew him to art in the first place.

As a Business major at the University of Central Oklahoma in the mid-90's he took an elective class in jewelry making that changed him.

Tom is from Japan and now an American citizen.

But the Chinese philosophy of Yin and Yang applies best to his art work.

Where sculpture often requires many hands, jewelry requires only his.

Where the isolation of working alone ends, the inspiration of working with other artists picks up.

Through the opposites of big ans small twist the silver linings of singular creativity, clean, simple lines that Orikasa laughingly refers to as 'Japaneesy'.

Work and play, big and small, they come together in a beautiful way sometimes, especially when an artist is able to make peace with both.

The Kasum Gallery is hosting a jewelry trunk show of Orikasa's work Saturday and Sunday, February 7th and 8th.

For more information go to http://www.kasumcontemporary.com