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Metro school wants to end partnership with vo-tech

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OKLAHOMA CITY -- A metro school wants to break ties with a vocational school. It’s a partnership that’s been on the books for decades but now, Millwood schools says it no longer works for them.

Twice a day, juniors and seniors travel from Millwood High School to Francis Tuttle for vocational training.

Along with them goes nearly hundreds of thousands of taxpayer dollars, something Superintendent Cecelia Robinson wants to change.

"We are currently sending $650,000 out of the northeast community to a community that really doesn't need dollars from this side of town," said Robinson.

The board wants to de-annex from Francis Tuttle and send students to metro tech instead.

"It’s hard for parents to be involved with their kids at Francis Tuttle."

Distance is another concern.

"Millwood students have had to travel 30 miles each day to attend Francis Tuttle versus Metro Tech because Metro Tech is right here in the community," said John Pettis Jr. City Councilman Ward 7.

"We have had a great partnership with Millwood schools for 20 years,” Ken Koch, Director of Marketing at Francis Tuttle said.

Francis Tuttle officials said they are aware of the concerns, but the decision is not in their hands.

"The state board of the career and technology education will weigh in the concerns and they will decide whether there is an election or not," said Koch.

Robinson wants to be clear - stating this has nothing to do with quality of education or the relationship between the schools. She said funds from Millwood amount to less than one percent of the Francis Tuttle’s budget. In her community, the money would go a long way.

"At the end of the day, if the tax payers want to spend their dollars in their community, they have every right to do so," Robinson said.

Officials said the State Board of Career and Technology is conducting an unlawful exclusion study. Once that is completed, both schools will have the opportunity to vote for their side.

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