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Oklahoma Law Enforcement Memorial sinking; seeking donations for repairs

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OKLAHOMA CITY – A memorial in Oklahoma City lists the names of our state’s fallen police officers who risked their lives for our safety.

“These are basically everyday citizens who think it’s worth taking a chance, to be risking their life to protect their families and their community,” Dennis Lippe, who runs the memorial, said.

The Oklahoma Law Enforcement Memorial is a way to remember the 784 officers killed in the line of duty in our state’s history.

Dedicated in 1969, it is now in need of repair.

“The original idea was just to expand it out to include six stones and when the contractor came out to give us an estimate, he made the comment, ‘You sure have a lot of water flow over this don’t you?’” Lippe said.

Experts say rain water underneath the plaza is making it sink.

Now, they need $58,000 to fix it and expand the plaza.

“When the families go up to do a rubbing or see their officer’s name, they go in the grass, which doesn’t sound like a problem unless there’s rain and then it’s soft,” Lippe said.

Only $2,500 has been raised so far and the nonprofit group that runs the memorial is hoping the public will step up to help.

“This is Oklahoma citizens’ memorial to their officers, and I would think they would want to have the nicest, best presentation of a memorial to their officers they could,” Lippe said.

When you come out to the law enforcement memorial, you’ll see a brand new stone marker with the name Trooper Nicholas Dees, who died earlier this year.

They want to add more than 150 names for the fallen officers they’ve discovered through research, but it will cost $1,500 to do it.

It’s a small part of the almost $60,000 needed for the memorial, so the lives lost aren’t forgotten.

“We have to have some place to honor their service and their sacrifice,” Lippe said.

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