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The debate is over! How much alcohol can women really drink while pregnant?

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If your doctor has ever told you that small amounts of alcohol are safe to drink during pregnancy, a new report is proving them wrong.

The American Academy of Pediatrics just released a new report in the journal Pediatrics.

No amount of alcohol, whether wine, beer, or liquor, is safe to drink while pregnant, no matter the trimester.

While research shows that most women cut out alcohol completely during pregnancy, the report states that a small percentage of mothers-to-be admit they continue to drink, while some even admit to binge drinking.

According to Live Science, Dr. Janet F. Williams, one of the study's lead authors, wants to set the record straight on alcohol consumption during pregnancy, pointing to 30 years of evidence of alcohol-related birth defects.

"Prenatal exposure to alcohol is the leading preventable cause of birth defects and developmental disabilities," Williams said.

That early exposure can affect the growing baby's organs, its hearing, and can also lead to physical, behavioral, and learning problems.

The new study states babies of mothers who drink alcohol while pregnant are 12 times more likely to suffer a deformity.

Fetal Alcohol Syndrome also causes growth problems and these common facial features.

The new study states that alcohol can alter an unborn baby's brain function, so, no matter what your OBGYN or your Great Aunt Sally may have told you, pregnant mothers should stop drinking alcohol immediately.