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Cowboys See Homecoming In Different Ways

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An estimated 80,000 people come to Stillwater each year to take part in what's called America's greatest homecoming celebration.

Whether it's dying the fountain orange, walk around or homecoming and hoops the Cowboys all seem to see this week in different ways.

“You can tell it's going to be a big day and everybody's going to be here,” Mike Gundy, OSU head coach, said.  “I get 250 different people wanting tickets and they all want four and that's the equivalent to about a thousand tickets, and, so that's a good thing.  The bad thing is I have to tell them, no I don't have them.”

“One of the most coolest traditions in all of homecomings throughout the nation,” Mason Rudolph, OSU starting quarterback, said.  “Our guys do it well here.  It will be exciting weekend for everyone to come back whether its alumni or current students to really rally around this program, and make it a cool experience.”

“I really don't know, but driving around the sorority houses they have a lot of I think it's called pomping, or something like that,” OSU junior defensive back, Ashton Lampkin said.  “I'm not for sure, but they have all that stuff going on, so that's pretty cool.  “I don't really see it.  I don't really go on campus that much.”

“Does homecoming mean anything to us in our preparation?” Glenn Spencer, OSU defensive coordinator, said.  “No, and what happens Saturday, no.  I love Oklahoma State, and I love what it does for our community and our alumni and our fan base and I love that that event they can enjoy it, but in our world it's going to be three and a half hours of gut wrenching hell.”

The good news for fans is OSU's won six of their last eight homecoming games.