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More couples opting to sign prenuptial agreement before reaching the altar

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OKLAHOMA CITY - As many couples prepare to head to the altar, several of those pairs are stopping by a lawyer's office first.

"I think because the topic of divorce is within the general public's conscience I think you're seeing more prenups," Attorney Chris Smith said.

Each year, Smith sees up to 50 clients asking for a prenup, and he says it's not who you think.

"It used to be that it was only incredibly wealthy or people who had assets have a desire for a prenup, but we're not seeing that as much," he said.

A 2015 study found attorneys are issuing these contracts more than ever.

However, Smith says that simple piece of paper can result in a quick, unhappy ending.

"I've done some that have cost some marriages," he said. "Some husbands or wives who want a prenup haven't had that conversation with the spouse until last-minute and it creates all kind of problems."

A prenuptial agreement helps protect a person's assets, protect one spouse from the other's debt and it can determine how assets are split following a death.

Experts say many couple opt to get a prenup to avoid costly disputes in case of a divorce.

Surprisingly, Smith says it's the partner who wants to prove they're in it for love, not money, who suggests a prenup.

"That's something that's almost romantic, if you can be romantic talking about prenups," he said.

"I think you come into a relationship with what you have. I think you should leave with it," said Andrea Nakvinda.

"No marriage lasts, so you want to keep what you've got? Definitely want to sign one," Antoine Jackson said.

Smith says every prenuptial agreement looks different based on the assets a person wants covered in it.