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Barbie’s new petite, curvy, and tall dolls – good idea or overly sensitive consumers?

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At 57-years-old, Barbie is getting a makeover that some are calling "long overdue."

The blonde bombshell is one of the most popular toys of all time, seen by children worldwide as an iconic beauty.

In fact, 92 percent of American girls between the ages of 3 and 12 have owned a Barbie.

It's no wonder so many women have turned to "waist-training," wearing a corset-like device to try to make their waists smaller - a trend fueled by celebrities, which doctors say can squeeze your organs and cause heart problems.

However, in recent years, Barbie's "perfect figure" has faced criticism, considering, in human measurements, Barbie would be over six feet tall with an 18-inch waist.

Recently, other toy manufacturers have created dolls like Lammily, which come with much more realistic proportions, sending a positive message to children about body image.

Barbie's profits have decreased by 20 percent since 2012, though she still brings in about a billion dollars worldwide in annual sales for Mattel.

And now Mattel is making an historic  move, hoping their new line-up, which "better reflects a diverse world," will help boost sales.

Petite, curvy, and tall Barbies, with seven skin tones, 22 eye colors, and 24 hairstyles are now available online and will hit store shelves in March.

Don't worry Barbie lovers, original Barbies will still be available too.

While many turned to Twitter to celebrate the change, calling it a win for kids of all shapes and sizes, others, like actress Kirstie Alley, imply that the new shapes were never needed because Barbie is just a toy.

What do you think?

Here's the other side of the coin: