Calmer weather in store this week

Sources: Oklahoma City Public Schools superintendent planning to resign from district

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Rob Neu on Flashpoint

OKLAHOMA CITY – As the budget crisis continues to take a toll on public education across Oklahoma, the state’s largest school district is facing a new challenge.

On Monday, sources confirmed to NewsChannel 4 that Oklahoma City Public Schools Superintendent Rob Neu told board members that he would be resigning from that position.

A special board meeting is set for Thursday evening to discuss Neu’s employment with the district.

Neu is currently in Boston to attend the National School Boards Association conference.

“Currently, there hasn’t been any formal resignation paperwork submitted by Mr. Neu. The OKC Board of Education is planning on holding a special meeting to address this topic on Thursday (4/14) at 5:30pm, the OKCPS Board Clerk is in the process of formally filing the meeting,” Mark Myers, a spokesman for the district, said in a statement.

The news comes amid budget cuts that are forcing district leaders to go to extreme measures to make ends meet.

Last month, Oklahoma City Public Schools announced that the district is “facing a catastrophic budget crisis due to a statewide revenue shortfall.”

Officials say 208 teaching positions will be cut, which will save the district $8 million, but will also increase class sizes.

On Thursday, district leaders announced that additional cuts are in the works.

Officials announced that the district will shed 93 administrative positions, 59 of which will come from the central office. The remaining 33 will be let go from administrative staffs at specific schools, saving the district an estimated $5.1 million.

The cuts to administrators and teachers only equal about $13 million, meaning the district will have to cut $17 million more to reach its budget reduction goal.

Board members expect to discuss the remaining cuts — which will come from district programs and services — at their April 25 meeting.