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Judge denies agencies’ request to pause work on Dakota Access pipeline

People sign a teepee with words of support for protestors at an encampment where hundreds of people have gathered to join the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe's protest against the construction of the Dakota Access Pipe (DAPL), near Cannon Ball, North Dakota, on September 3, 2016.
The Indian reservation in North Dakota is the site of the largest gathering of Native Americans in more than 100 years. Indigenous people from across the US are living in camps on the Standing Rock reservation as they protest the construction of the new oil pipeline which they fear will destroy their water supply.
 / AFP / Robyn BECK        (Photo credit should read ROBYN BECK/AFP/Getty Images)

People sign a teepee with words of support for protestors at an encampment where hundreds of people have gathered to join the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe's protest against the construction of the Dakota Access Pipe (DAPL), near Cannon Ball, North Dakota, on September 3, 2016. The Indian reservation in North Dakota is the site of the largest gathering of Native Americans in more than 100 years. Indigenous people from across the US are living in camps on the Standing Rock reservation as they protest the construction of the new oil pipeline which they fear will destroy their water supply. / AFP / Robyn BECK (Photo credit should read ROBYN BECK/AFP/Getty Images)

BISMARCK, N.D. -The Standing Rock Sioux Tribe was unsuccessful Monday in asking a federal judge to recognize three federal agencies’ request for a developer to “voluntarily pause” work on a segment of the Dakota Access pipeline that the tribe says holds sacred sites and artifacts.

The tribe said in court documents filed Monday that it wants U.S. District Judge James Boasberg to “formalize” the agencies’ requested stoppage for 20 miles (32 km) on both sides of the Missouri River at Lake Oahe in southern North Dakota.

The judge disagreed but did keep in place a previous order to halt construction on a small portion of the pipeline near the protest site near the Missouri River until a scheduled hearing Friday.

The company had not signaled its position on the government’s request.