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Former St. Louis police officer charged with first-degree murder for 2011 shooting

ST. LOUIS, Mo. - A former police officer is now facing first-degree murder charges for a shooting that left a driver dead in 2011.

FOX 2 obtained dash camera video of the incident that has not been publicly released, but the station confirms it is authentic.

Authorities say it all started when former Officer Jason Stockley attempted to make a traffic stop after a reported drug deal.

In the video, Stockley is seen getting out of his patrol car with his personal AK-47-style rifle, which is a violation of the St. Louis Police Department's policy on personal weapons.

The driver, Anthony Lamar Smith, speeds away in his car, jumping over a sidewalk to get away.

Prosecutors say Stockley shot at Smith's car before getting back into his patrol car.

The officer who is driving the patrol car begins a pursuit.

A speed monitor on the dash cam video clocks the officers exceeding 80 miles per hour on wet streets and speeding past stop signs.

At one point, the officer failed to make his turn and hit a tree.

”Back up,” Stockley yells.

It is difficult to hear exactly what is being said, but the St. Louis Circuit Attorney's Probable Cause Statement claims that Stockley said, "Going to kill this m***** ******, don't you know it."

When Smith slows down to pull over, Stockley is heard yelling, "Hit him right now."

The officers ram Smith's car before surrounding him. The probable cause statement alleges that Stockley fired five shots into the car, killing Smith.

 

Right after the shooting, police reported finding a gun on Smith, but prosecutors claim it “was later determined by lab analysis to have only (Stockley`s) DNA on it.”

It is not clear what happens at the end of the video as Stockley is seen rummaging through a bag in the back of a squad car.

The Circuit Attorney's Office responded with this statement:

"The people of the City of St. Louis have a right to determine whether the State has proven its case beyond a reasonable doubt. The courtroom is the appropriate forum for this matter. "

Stockley's attorney Neil Bruntrager called to say the video is just one piece of the evidence.  He says another surveillance video that’s not available, shows a different perspective.  He also points out that the Feds had this same video and declined to prosecute or even pursue the case in civil court.