One cake decorator’s response to violence in America: A trainload of sugar

NORMAN, Okla. - The structure could be cake.

Master cake decorator and baker Edith Hall says it's certainly possible to make a 45 foot long train out of cake.

But this locomotive will sit in the Expo Hall at the Tulsa State Fair for a whole week so, out of necessity, her husband made the skeleton out of plywood in their Missouri garage.

Edith continues, "And then I carved all the animals out of styrofoam."

But that being said, the rest of this Peace Train, as they're calling it, is all sugar.

"Gumballs, sixlets," says Hall.

Frosting, hard candy, and the cake decorator's best friend fondant.

A few days ago the construction crew on this project competed against each other in the annual Oklahoma Sugar Arts Show.

On Tuesday afternoon artists like Ceri Griffiths hung around just a little longer to decorate a sweet circus train.

"This is just fun," says Griffiths. "We all volunteer just to have a good time, to get some sugary love going on if you want to call it that, but, yes, we've had fun."

The Sugar Arts Show is Kerry Vincent's baby and has been for more than twenty years.

The 'Queen of Cake' and Edith Hall wanted to make a statement about the 'sugar load' of violence they saw as taking place in America these days.

Vincent's advice, "Talk first, be calm, have a cup of tea, and while you're at it you can pipe a few things on the Peach Train."

Their sweet response rolled into the station just in time for fair week in Tulsa.

They call it 'The Peace Train'.

The theme is 60's era 'tune in, turn on, and drip frosting'.

There's a good reason planners roped off this rolling stock well beyond arm's reach of spectators.

This carload of sugar is plenty enough to help the medicine go down.

The Peace Train sugar art exhibit will stay up at the Tulsa State Fair through Sunday.

For more information on the Annual Oklahoma Sugar Arts Show go to