Manhunt for Oklahoma man accused of shooting 6 people leaving two dead

Museum giving high school students in-depth look into Oklahoma City bombing

OKLAHOMA CITY -  One of the state's darkest days is being used to teach the next generation.

If you ask most Oklahoma-natives, they will likely be able to tell you where they were on April 19, 1995.

For the past several years, that fateful act, which claimed the lives of 168 people, has been a history lesson in textbooks across the state.

However, educators and Oklahoma City leaders believed that needed to change.

"I wanted them to see the story that, 21 years ago, the bomb went off in Oklahoma City. We turned our darkest hour into finest hour, pulled our city together," said Mike Turpen, chairman at the Oklahoma City National Memorial & Museum.

Turpen credits his wife, a teacher at U.S. Grant High School, with putting the plan into action.

"She's brought her students in the last five years, and she said it really made an impact on them to come to this amazing memorial and museum and to visit this sacred ground," he said.

The Oklahoma City National Memorial & Museum will be home to the new Uncover Discover Lab, giving students a chance to learn about forensics, investigative work, engineering and the bombing.

"One of the tasks we have, as educators, is being able to teach from the books and apply it to real life, and this lab does all of that,” said Drew Rhodes, a ninth grade history teacher at U.S. Grant.

All ninth grade students in Oklahoma City Public Schools will be required to go to the new high-tech lab.

"This will be impactful in history and I think also in terms of life lessons,” Rhodes said.

In all, experts estimate 3,000 kids will visit the lab in the first year, with costs covered by OG&E, ONE Gas and AT&T.