Oklahoma earthquake victims demand help

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OKLAHOMA CITY, Okla -- "This is where the outside fracture went through my home. This is where I planned to spend the rest of my life."

Earthquake victim, Jackie Dill was fighting back tears.

Her story is one of many heartbreaking accounts shared Wednesday at the state capitol.

Oklahoma earthquake victims are joining forces and speaking out.

Victim, Lisa Griggs said, "One time I dropped a Coke and instead of puddling, it ran under the cabinets."

Lisa Grigg's Guthrie home required 106-thousand dollars in repairs. Thankfully, this former California resident had some earthquake insurance.

But many others DO NOT. Pawnee Mayor, Brad Sewell said, "Of all the damage, there has been a $24,000 payout. TOTAL! Everybody who has been effected by this."

Pawnee, Oklahoma's town square has been rattled repeatedly. The damage was widespread, including a building on the Registry of Historic Places.

Representative Richard Morrissette has been a vocal activist for change. "Petroleum is important. I am in complete support of the oil and gas industry. But it's an irresponsible way in which some of these companies have chosen to ignore the science."

Rep. Morrissette is leading a charge to action. He proposes waste water recycling, partially funded by an gas tax increase.

He'd also like to see oil and gas companies set up a fund to reimburse homeowners with earthquake damage.

And Morrissette wants a task force to study the growing problem and find a reasonable solution before it's too late.

He said, "These earthquakes are a warning. Something greater is coming if we don't act. The time to act is now and I pray the newly elected officials will have courage to do what's right for the people of Oklahoma."