Temperatures to be on the cool side following weekend showers
Watch KFOR Live Interactive Radar

Oklahomans wait in line before sunup to vote first thing Election Day

This is an archived article and the information in the article may be outdated. Please look at the time stamp on the story to see when it was last updated.

OKLAHOMA CITY - The polls opened at 7 a.m. Tuesday, and some people waited in the dark to beat the lines and make their voices heard.

Elizabeth Tankard claimed the first spot in line to vote at her polling place, First Church in downtown Oklahoma City.

"I just think it's one of the greatest rights and privileges we have as a country," Tankard said.

Not only is she joining voters to decide our nation's 45th president, but big issues affecting Oklahoma, like seven state questions addressing everything from criminal justice reform, right to farm, even where beer and wine is sold.

"This is where the things that affect our day to day lives get decided," Tankard said.

Tankard said she's proud to exercise her right to vote.

"They say that half the people don't vote, and I just don't believe that. I'm like half the people I know who are on Facebook talking about, you know, what they think about things, they're not voting. The odds are not in their favor. I'm not happy about it," Tankard said.

"I think everybody would say this is probably one of the craziest election cycles we've seen in our lifetime," said Mark McAdow, Senior Pastor at First Church.

McAdow is proud First Church is hosting a polling place and said his recent sermons have focused around the importance of voting.

"Obviously not indicating who people should vote for, but to identify biblical principles that should help us in choosing the best candidate," McAdow said.

For Tankard, she's just proud to walk away with her 'I Voted' sticker.

"The election cycles long. It gets exhausting. I'm just going to be happy that we're here and what happens, happens and that I did my part," Tankard said.