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State officials take action after 5.0 earthquake hits Cushing

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OKLAHOMA CITY– The Oklahoma Corporation Commission takes action after the 5.0 earthquake in Cushing on Sunday evening.

The large earthquake struck in Payne County around 7:44 p.m. and caused damage to buildings and homes in the area.

The new plan released Tuesday involves shutting down wells and restricting wells near the epicenter.

First, all Arbuckle disposal well operations in a 6 mile area must cease.

Second, all Arbuckle disposal wells within 10 miles must reduce volume by 25-percent of their last 30 day average.

And finally all Arbuckle disposal wells within 15 miles are limited in volume to their last 30 day average.

15 of the Arbuckle disposal wells included in the latest directive have already been shut-in by the Sept. 3, 2016 directive.

Under this initial action plan:

  • 7 wells will be shut-in
  • 16 wells will be reduced 25 percent (In addition to 40 percent volume reduction that was imposed earlier in 2016)
  • 31 wells will be limited in volume to their last 30 day average (In addition to 40 percent volume reduction that was imposed earlier in 2016)
  • Deadline for shut-in compliance is Nov. 14.
  • Deadline for volume limit compliance is Nov. 21.

OCCC Cushing Map

“I support the quick action taken today by the Oklahoma Corporation Commission, which regulates the oil and gas industry in our state, as it worked closely with state researchers at the Oklahoma Geological Survey to put in place mandatory reductions in activity impacting induced seismicity.  Two years ago, we established the coordinating council on seismicity. Regulators continue to target areas for additional scrutiny that are experiencing increased seismic activity, which has led to the shutting down of disposal wells or reducing the volume of disposal wells and flow pressure in known fault lines where we believe there is a correlation to earthquakes,”  Governor Mary Fallin said in a statement.