Health experts warning Oklahomans to get vaccinated amid mumps outbreak

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GARFIELD COUNTY, Okla. - A mumps outbreak is hitting some Oklahoma communities hard.

In Garfield County alone, more than 290 cases of the mumps have been reported.

Of those patients, 66 had been vaccinated.

Even though that's concerning, health officials still urge you to get the vaccine

"It's our hope that with the vaccine at least the symptoms would be lessened some as they build immunity, and that they would be protected to the best of their abilities," says Carla Dionne, with the Garfield County Health Department.

Officials tell us those vaccinated for the mumps may not suffer with the symptoms as long, and could reduce the risk of exposure to others.

As a concerned mom, it's something Jennifer Henry says is worth it.

"I would much rather take the precaution of getting them and pray that helps prevent it. But nothing's guaranteed," Henry said.

"It's kind of what do you, you know. Darned if you do, darned if you don't, so it's like what's the best option for your child?" said Henry.

With a daughter who is only 8 days old, she's particularly concerned her baby will get it.

"That's scary because it's like how did this happen? What did I do wrong as a parent to allow this to happen?" said Henry.

Officials say if you think you have the mumps, their recommendations are similar to that of the flu: cover sneezes and coughs, and don't share food or drinks.

"Stay home, you're sick. Stay home, particularly if they're not feeling well and there's swelling in the jaw line. If there is, they should call their physician or call the health department, but stay home!" says Dionne.