Calmer weather in store this week

Mysterious call will leave you scratching your head

OKLAHOMA CITY - Shelly Johnston was just a teenager and behind the wheel.

“A drunk driver ran a stop sign or light or something and hit us head on going 75,” she said.

The accident took her sight and her dream of playing professional golf, but not her will to live.

She relies on her trusty companion, Jefferson, to help her get around safely.

Tuesday, Jefferson was away at the groomer when Shelly's phone rang.

A mysterious caller was asking questions.    

“He said, ‘Are you between the ages of 50 and 63?’ I said, ‘Yes I am,’” Shelly said.

The caller went onto ask Shelly if she worked in the last year, which she hadn’t.

“He said real fast, ‘Okay thank you so much for your time,” and just hung up the phone.”

Shelly doesn't qualify for disability, because her husband makes too much money.  

She keeps trying to call back the # though, but they won’t take her calls now.

The automated message identifies itself as "National Disability" and goes onto say that their records indicate Shelly has already spoken with one of their agents and does not qualify at this time. 

When we call that same number we get a completely different greeting.

It asks us to email any questions to customerservicenow2016@gmail.com.

We plugged in that email address online and pulled up complaints from across the country.

No one seems to know exactly for sure what the calls are really about.

It could be a case of cramming, where a company tries to sneak charges onto your telephone bill for services you never ordered, which is why you should be carefully reviewing your phone bill each month.

Shelly is a tad uneasy about it all, but taking things in stride.

“I'm happy I'm alive and being grateful for what I have,” she said.

It is important to understand questions before you answer yes or no over the phone, because you might inadvertently agree to something and not even realize it.