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Syrian-born doctor living in Oklahoma reacts to air strikes

EDMOND, Okla. - Dr. Amer Nouh says it was difficult seeing the aftermath of the chemical attacks on Syrian civilians.

"You cannot not feel too much, emotional seeing, like little kids, babies, 9 months old, 3 years old. They are dying. They are dead," said Dr. Nouh. "These pictures were really very heartbreaking even for us Syrians who are seeing pictures like this for over more than 6 years."

Dr. Nouh is a native of Syria but he left a long time ago in 1998.

He moved to France and then to the United States where he runs the Neuro Pain Care Clinic in Edmond.

While he was sad to see the images of the chemical attacks, he rejoiced when the United States carried out air strikes in retaliation.

"It's really ironic for me as a Syrian, to, of origin, that the airplanes and airports that my father and my family paid from their taxes to build, being bombed and I feel happy," said Dr. Nouh.

Dr. Nouh says this air strike was way overdue and should have happened several years ago.

He still has two brothers and sisters in Syria, in one of the cities surrounded by the Syrian army.

He says they've been ordered to evacuate by next week but they're holding out hope they won't have to.

"They are preparing their personal belongings to take with them when they are evacuating next week. But if something would happen from now to then, they resisted the evacuation and the bombing for six years," he said.

And Dr. Nouh hopes that the United States does not back down on Syria now.

"I really hope it will not stop at these 59 missiles," said Dr. Nouh. "If we want to keep people in their country, we need to find a solution. And a solution comes by helping the people get rid of the dictatorship there."