Temps to remain in the 50s and 60s with slight chance for rain over the weekend

“It’s changed the way I look at life,” Man remembers conversation with woman minutes before 1995 bombing

OKLAHOMA CITY - Oklahomans gathered in remembrance to honor the lives lost 22 years ago on April 19, 1995.

Dozens gathered for the 22nd anniversary of the 1995 bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building.

"A few days in history showed the impact of our community coming together in April 19, 1995,” said Mike Turpen, chairman for the Oklahoma City National Memorial.

Each year on this date, Oklahomans come together in remembrance.

For one Meeker resident, he always thinks of one woman who’s been on his mind since the tragic day.

"We had some Social Security work to do for my brother, so I wanted to get the call in as fast as I could so I didn't get put on hold. So, I called right at 9 o'clock,” said Ron Nicely.

He spoke to a woman who Nicely said he’ll never forget.

"I got a very nice lady, very professional and kind. I think she kind of sensed I was frustrated and been working on this claim for a while,” Nicely said.

She patiently helped him with what he needed in just a few minutes - the time was about 9:03.

"We hung up the phone and, before we did, I told her to have a nice day,” Nicely said.

At the time, he had no idea that was possibly the last conversation she’d ever have.

"I didn't even put two and two together that Social Security was in that building. Something was on television that told me, and I looked at my wife and said 'My God,'" Nicely said.

Nicely doesn’t know if the woman survived or not, but he said a tree in his backyard, which was split in half during an ice storm, serves as a constant reminder of her kindness because it’s now shaped like an angel.

"Her last act was more than likely helping us,” Nicely said. “It means everything. It's changed the way I look at life."

Nicely hopes to somehow reach the woman or her family if she did not survive so he can say thank you. ​