Refugee creates business to help children in war-torn areas write

“You feel like you`re alone. You feel like you`re in a corner, like this can`t be how the world is,” Ashier Majok said.

There`s no government where Ashier Majok grew up in South Sudan.

And a there's a fear of being shot by terrorists.

“No food. The harvest is dying. It`s not a fun place to be because there`s not, there`s no hope for tomorrow,” Majok said.

Ashier's family fled to the Houston, Texas when he was five.

Houston was better, but not good.

“And Hurricane Rita hit and it was just devastating. We were like, okay. We lost our friends. We lost our house. We lost our belongings,” Majok said.

Including personal journals, which were something his dad had already stolen during his earlier attempts to flee Sudan.

“Started going back. Trying to jot down the whole journey, and so he would work on that every single day. It was a hefty journal so that was swept away,” Majok said.

So, during college Ashier came up with a business idea, Type It Up Co., a way to get your handwritten documents transferred to a digital format.

“We know that this older generation has important documents whether it be journals, recipes or just letters they wrote to their significant other,” Majok said.

He hires contractors, from college students to even his high school English teacher.

And 10% of the proceeds goes to buying notebooks and pencils for children in South Sudan.

“Our mission is to get this world to write together," Majok said.

So far they've donated 1,100 notebooks in the past few months. His hope is to give children an escape from the harsh realities they live in and educate them through writing.

“The power of the pen and paper is powerful. Just to learn as we were supposed to and not have to remember everything and to not have to write in dirt,” he said.

Click here or more information on Type It Up Co.