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Oklahoma woman upset after toxic gas leaks from family’s home again 

PONCA CITY, Okla. - The nightmare continues for a Ponca City family once forced from their home because of toxic methane gas seeping up through the ground.

For years, the Walls family has been dealing with the methane gas.

In the summer of 2016, they were finally able to move back into their fully-owned home after almost four years of living in hotels and rentals. That was after the Oklahoma Corporation Commission contracted a $30,000 ventilator to be installed in their house.

The ventilator didn't solve the problem, but was supposed to get it under control.  Meanwhile, the family still had to buy and install all electric appliances for their safety, as well as find a source of heat that didn't require electricity.

But problems caused by the methane continued.

The driveway designed to help contain the underground gas crushed a sewer pipe.

"My husband worked on it for months," Sherry Walls said of her husband, Chris.

It was one more complication to a nightmare that won't end.

"He felt like he was powerless," Sherry said. "That his manhood was being taken away, that he couldn't take care of his family."

Now, Sherry must push forward alone, dealing with the death of her son and her husband's suicide all in the past year.

"I felt like there's a purpose that I'm still here," she said. "My neighbor got me thinking, 'Let's finish what your husband started.'"

An environmental group, Earthworks, brought in an infrared camera to the Walls' house to show the gas coming up from below.

"Very, very scary," Sherry said.

The amount of methane gas and other potentially dangerous compounds released was compared to the amount released directly from oil and gas facilities.

"There's no denying there's a major issue here," she said.

The Corporation Commission seems to agree, after telling News 4 the ventilation system installed in Sherry's home doesn't appear to be effective.

Now, Sherry is demanding answers and a real solution.

"I think somebody owes me a house," she said, with plans to seek legal action.