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No U.S. Cavalry horses at Fort Reno any more but plenty of ghost stories

FORT RENO, OKLAHOMA -- They had the place to themselves for a long time.

Since the Army didn't use horses or mules any longer, spirits roaming the old barracks and officers' quarters at Fort Reno had few witnesses to their alleged activities.

But from Wendy Ogden's very first day of work at these renovated officers' quarters a few years back, she heard the stories of another woman who walked these halls before the house was even open.

Wendy states contractors, "Were working on the north side around the windows. They both saw a lady walk through the center wall that divided the duplex in half."

She has letters from visitors who've seen her, too.

One of the old saddles in the tack room out back also gets a good reading from mediums who tell her some long dead owner is still attached somehow.

Jimmy Johnston has heard every story on the place from his usual perch in the visitor center at the cavalry fort.

"Everybody has some story to tell," he says.

From playful hair pulling, to phantom footsteps on the upper floors, to lights going on and off, these are some of the experiences others have related to him.

"It's hard to say," he admits. "I've never seen one."

We walk into one house where visitors report seeing a little boy ghost and a lady, too.

"It's usually the older buildings that really have the activity in them," he says.

This Victorian barracks, which dates back to 1891 seems to have room for a lot more ghosts.

Johnston has reports of a little girl wandering here and a mother who is always looking for her.

He says there's another ghost who's always wanting to cook for visitors.

Johnston says, "She came out here and talked to one of the ladies that came down here and told her she loved to make biscuits with molasses."

She might be the one in this picture.

Look behind the kids in the garden.

Some people see these shadows as a ghostly presence watching them.

"It looks like a lady with her hand on her hip," he says.

When Jimmy Johnston takes visitors on ghost tours this time of year he tells them to take lots of pictures.

You never know what might be walking around out here on the prairie before or after the sun goes down.

For ghost tour information and more on the history of the fort go to www.fortreno.org or call (405) 262- 3987.