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NAACP, OHP find no evidence of racial profiling during stop in Stroud

OKLAHOMA CITY - Members of the NAACP and The Oklahoma Highway patrol met Wednesday to discuss accusations of racial profiling during a traffic stop near Stroud.

"The meeting with OHP went very well. We looked at the video the camera footage of what happened. I am satisfied onto what I observed on the video. I can honestly say I didn’t see it to appear to be racially motivated," said Anthony R Douglas of the NAACP.

"The individual that had been stopped felt like he had been racially profiled, that was not the case we found out. We did our initial investigation, watched the video and talked to Mr Douglas about it. We were able to get it resolved we feel like," said Captain Paul Timmons with OHP.

On January  4, Reverend Eric Gill was pulled over on the Turner Turnpike near Stroud.  Gill didn't initially know why he was stopped. When he pulled into the McDonald's on the turnpike, the officer asked him to get out of his car, when he did, he raised his hands.

The raising of his hands prompted the officer to ask more questions when Gill got into the cruiser.

"You know, it kind of raises a red flag to law enforcement officers, people get out and instantly throw their hands up," said Timmons.

The Officer and Reverend had what NAACP leaders call a respectful conversation and the officer wrote Gill a warning for left lane violation.

Both sides offered advice on how to avoid these situations in the future.

"To try to prevent these things drive in the right hand lane until you have to get into the left to pass someone," said Douglas.

"The main thing is making sure that your hands stay visible and you are compliant with the requests of the officer," said Timmons.