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Oklahoma high school students build modified toy car for girl with disability

OKLAHOMA CITY - Recently, U.S. News & World Report honored five Oklahoma City schools as being among the best in the nation. One of those is Dove Science Academy.

This story proves the excellence of the students who go there.

Little Kori got a special surprise for her fourth birthday, a gift her family never imagined possible.

“You see children like Kori say, 'Oh, I want a car, I want something like that' but, for us in our family, it may not have been something that was an option,” said mother Kori Mack.

Kori has a rare disease that makes it difficult to walk and use her hands so the students at Dove modified a pink car to allow her to accelerate by pushing a button. They also added more restraints, so her body is upright and secure while driving.

It took a month and untold hours to build.

“It's a little girl, and I hope that she will be very happy,” said student Jalen Grier.

And, when the day arrived to take her new car home, she was delighted. It's a gift presented to the family at Special Care Inc., the school in which Kori attends.

Her father, an 18-year veteran in the U.S. Air Force, offered the students a reward for their hard work.

“So, what I wanted to do is present this to you because this is a token of our appreciation because you guys are the foundation of what this nation will be moving forward,” said father Maurice Mack to the students as he presented a wooden plaque.

And, while this is a special gift for a child, it also represents the ingenuity and character of this younger generation.

“To even have the enthusiasm behind it as an extracurricular class,” said Brittany Mack. “That is wonderful, and today STEM is the driving force behind what can be in the world today.”

The car was free for the family. It cost $300 to buy, mostly through donations.

They hope to build more modified toys cars for kids who need them in the future.