Rain chances possible starting middle of next week

Seaba Station Motorcycle Museum

This is an archived article and the information in the article may be outdated. Please look at the time stamp on the story to see when it was last updated.

WARWICK, OKLAHOMA— Before the state highway, before Rt. 66, before this stretch of road was even paved, John Seaba built a gas station and machine shop in Warwick, Oklahoma.

Eighty years later Gerald Tims and Jerry Ries filled it up with machines again, not to work on, but to display. “I had a big collection of motorcycles already,” says Gerald. “I was basically looking for a place to display them.”

Welcome to the Seaba Station Motorcycle Museum. It’s the latest incarnation of the old shop, antique store, and gas station. Gerald and Jerry are old friends who first met over the sale of a motorcycle. Jerry says, “He wound up buying it.”

Now their building houses a huge collection of them in more than five thousand square feet of floor space. Gerald Tims says, “With the history of the building already we thought this was the perfect place to do it.”

You get the full history here, a century that started with bikes that had motors attached, and racers that could reach speeds of 100mph but had no brakes. “This is a 1913 Pope board track racer,” says Tims.
Jerry and Gerald restored the old station. They put in a new ceiling but kept the garage feel. It doesn’t hurt that hundreds of old motorcycles and scooters crowd for parking space.

Gerald has a Triumph motorcycle dealership in the Oklahoma City Metro but his museum has a brand new 1979 model that’s still in the shipping crate. “It’s probably one of the most unique things in here,” says Tims.

Their newest addition is an autographed Evel Knievel helmet. They hung that right over the Evel Knievel pin ball machine. “We’re still finding thngs,” says Jerry Ries.

Outside it’s a cold, misty day. Not much good for riding and hardly enough time to see what locals call the oldest plumbed outhouse west of the Mississippi before you have to go in and get warm. Jerry, who usually mans the register says, “We get visitors from all over, just about every country you can name is in our registry.”

If you still like motorcycles this is the place to be. The old Seaba Station won’t fix your wreck, but if it’s rare enough, Jerry and Gerald say you can park it in here anytime.