Group protests execution, claims too much doubt

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OKLAHOMA CITY — Timothy Shaun Stemple’s family met at the Capitol on Tuesday hoping to get a last minute stay of execution. In less than 48 hours the State of Oklahoma will execute the 46-year-old man for the brutal murder of his wife back in 1996.

Court documents reveal the victim, Trisha Stemple, had fractured bones all over her body, including her skull, and appeared to have been intentionally run over.

Led by the Oklahoma Coalition to Abolish the Death Penalty, the Stemple family gathered at the State Capitol pleading for a stay of execution.

The family says there are theories from forensic pathologists who say the death of the victim was by car accident, not from murder.

The family says that evidence, as well as other items, never made it into court.

“When my sister in law died, my brother didn’t even get to grieve her death. Within a few days, all fingers were pointing to him because he had life insurance and he had an affair,” Janae Smucker said. 

She says her brother is no killer.

“There is too much doubt,” Sen. Consatnce Johnson said.

Even those who’ve lost loved ones to murderers stood by the family’s side.

The Pardon and Parole Board voted 4-1 to deny Stemple’s clemency.

All Stemple’s legal appeals have also been denied.

“We don’t have the power to grant clemency without a recommendation from the (Pardon and Parole) board,” Alex Weintz said, Gov. Fallin’s spokesman. “The governor does have the power to issue a stay but she does not plan to do that.”

Stemple is scheduled for execution by lethal injection Thursday at 6 p.m.

The Oklahoma Coalition to Abolish the Death Penalty says the state has released 10 people from death row who were wrongfully convicted.