“Batkid” Returns to San Francisco to Help Other Sick Children

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UPDATE 8:43 p.m Thursday: Batkid will return to Gotham City — San Francisco.

This time, it won’t be to arrest the Penguin or to capture the Riddler.

Five-year-old Miles Scott of Tulelake, Siskyou County, will arrive in San Francisco (most likely in the family van instead of a decked-out Lamborghini ) on Saturday to cheer folks on at “Brave the Bay,” formerly known as the SFPD Challenge, Make A Wish spokeswoman Jen Wilson said Thursday.

SAN FRANCISCO –  12,000 volunteers who donned superhero capes and morphed San Francisco into Gotham City can’t make sure a California boy will stay clear of leukemia for the rest of his life.

But, in handing the 5-year-old the key to the city on Friday, they sure gave him every boy’s dream-come-true for a few hours and a memory for a lifetime.

After the Batphone rang at the Grand Hyatt hotel, Miles – a shy kindergartner with bright blue eyes who is in remission from his cancer – became “Batkid,” complete with mask, cape and puffy fake muscles. Wearing Velcro sneakers, Miles exited the Batmobile – a decked-out black Lamborghini – but only after unstrapping himself from his car seat. (Safety first, Robin.)

batkid

“He’s just the cutest,” said Jackie Johnston, one of the hundreds of fans who had come out to watch.

But Miles isn’t just cute. He’s a cancer survivor. And in the eyes of the world, he’s a hero.

All this is happening because of what happened after Patricia Wilson of the Make-A-Wish Greater Bay Area Foundation sent an email in October asking for some volunteers to help give Miles his wish.

The email went viral, and between 11,000 and 12,000 volunteers came to contribute their efforts, whether it be acting, being stage crew or assisting in a myriad of other ways.

The Make-A-Wish Foundation in the Bay Area has been operating since 1984, when it was able to grant 27 wishes. Now one of the largest chapters nationwide, foundation grants 300 wishes per year and 6,000 wishes in all