Update: Former OU and Vikings star Adrian Peterson issues statement on Facebook

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UPDATED 9/15/2014 1:50 P.M.-

(CNN) –  Hours after the Minnesota Vikings announced Adrian Peterson will practice this week and is expected to play Sunday, Peterson is now telling his side of the story.

Peterson turned himself in to East Texas authorities Saturday, two days after an indictment alleged the 29-year-old father did “recklessly or by criminal negligence cause bodily injury” to his son. Peterson quickly posted $15,000 bail and was released, according to the Montgomery County Sheriff’s Office.

ESPN’s Adam Schefter  posted a statement on Facebook that he attributes to Adrian Peterson. The Minnesota Vikings have just told CNN Sports that the statement is authentic.

Peterson’s statement reads as follows:

“My attorney has asked me not to discuss the facts of my pending case. I hope you can respect that request and help me honor it. I very much want the public to hear from me but I understand that it is not appropriate to talk about the facts in detail at this time. Nevertheless, I want everyone to understand how sorry I feel about the hurt I have brought to my child.

I never wanted to be a distraction to the Vikings organization, the Minnesota community or to my teammates. I never imagined being in a position where the world is judging my parenting skills or calling me a child abuser because of the discipline I administered to my son.

I voluntarily appeared before the grand jury several weeks ago to answer any and all questions they had. Before my grand jury appearance, I was interviewed by two different police agencies without an attorney. In each of these interviews I have said the same thing, and that is that I never ever intended to harm my son. I will say the same thing once I have my day in court.

I have to live with the fact that when I disciplined my son the way I was disciplined as a child, I caused an injury that I never intended or thought would happen. I know that many people disagree with the way I disciplined my child. I also understand after meeting with a psychologist that there are other alternative ways of disciplining a child that may be more appropriate.

I have learned a lot and have had to reevaluate how I discipline my son going forward. But deep in my heart I have always believed I could have been one of those kids that was lost in the streets without the discipline instilled in me by my parents and other relatives. I have always believed that the way my parents disciplined me has a great deal to do with the success I have enjoyed as a man. I love my son and I will continue to become a better parent and learn from any mistakes I ever make.

I am not a perfect son. I am not a perfect husband. I am not a perfect parent, but I am, without a doubt, not a child abuser. I am someone that disciplined his child and did not intend to cause him any injury. No one can understand the hurt that I feel for my son and for the harm I caused him. My goal is always to teach my son right from wrong and that’s what I tried to do that day.

I accept the fact that people feel very strongly about this issue and what they think about my conduct. Regardless of what others think, however, I love my son very much and I will continue to try to become a better father and person.”

 

 

UPDATED 9/15/2014 11:01 A.M

(CNN) — Embattled Minnesota Vikings running back Adrian Peterson will practice this week and is scheduled to play in Sunday’s game against the New Orleans Saints, team owners said in a Monday statement.

Peterson turned himself in to East Texas authorities Saturday, two days after an indictment alleged the 29-year-old father did “recklessly or by criminal negligence cause bodily injury” to his son. Peterson quickly posted $15,000 bail and was released, according to the Montgomery County Sheriff’s Office.

The following statement is from Vikings Owners Zygi Wilf and Mark Wilf on the Vikings website:

“Today’s decision was made after significant thought, discussion and consideration. As evidenced by our decision to deactivate Adrian from yesterday’s game, this is clearly a very important issue. On Friday, we felt it was in the best interests of the organization to step back, evaluate the situation, and not rush to judgment given the seriousness of this matter. At that time, we made the decision that we felt was best for the Vikings and all parties involved.

To be clear, we take very seriously any matter that involves the welfare of a child. At this time, however, we believe this is a matter of due process and we should allow the legal system to proceed so we can come to the most effective conclusions and then determine the appropriate course of action. This is a difficult path to navigate, and our focus is on doing the right thing. Currently we believe we are at a juncture where the most appropriate next step is to allow the judicial process to move forward.

We will continue to monitor the situation closely and support Adrian’s fulfillment of his legal responsibilities throughout this process.”

CNN – NFL running back Adrian Peterson turned himself in to authorities in Texas early Saturday on a felony charge of child abuse, the Montgomery County Sheriff’s Office said.

He’s accused of using a switch to discipline his son, according to his attorney.

Shortly after, Peterson was freed on a $15,000 bail, authorities said.

Soon after the news broke, the Vikings released a statement saying they have deactivated Peterson for Sunday’s game.

News of his indictment casts another shadow over the NFL, which is reeling from the fallout over its reaction to recent domestic violence incidents, including then-Baltimore Ravens running back Ray Rice allegedly punching his then-fiancee Janay Palmer in a casino elevator. (The two are now married.)

League officials have been heavily criticized for their actions in that case, including the initial two-game suspension given to Rice prior to surveillance video that emerged showing him delivering Palmer a knockout blow.

Authorities didn’t divulge details Friday about what led to a grand jury to indict Peterson on a felony charge of injury to a child.

But Peterson’s lawyer, Rusty Hardin, said the “charged conduct involves using a switch to spank his son” — explaining that his client did so while doling out discipline much like “he experienced as a child growing up in east Texas.”

“Adrian never intended to harm his son and deeply regrets the unintentional injury,” Hardin said, describing Peterson as a loving father.

Peterson “will continue to insist on his innocence of any intended wrongdoing,” the lawyer said.

Hardin said his client has “cooperated fully with authorities and voluntarily testified before the grand jury for several hours.”

“Adrian will address the charges with the same respect and responsiveness he has brought to this inquiry from its beginning,” the lawyer said.

According to Texas law, a person can be convicted of injury to a child if they are proven to have caused bodily or mental injury “intentionally, knowingly, recklessly or with criminal negligence” or causing such harm by omission.

The alleged abuse took place in Montgomery County, which is north of Houston.

The 29-year-old Peterson grew up in Palestine, Texas, which is 150 miles north of Houston and 100 miles southeast of Dallas.

A running back for the Vikings since 2007, Peterson rushed for 75 yards in his team’s season-opening 34-6 rout of the St. Louis Rams.

Last year, Peterson’s other son died after allegedly being abused by another man.

Authorities in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, found the 2-year-old boy unresponsive, and later determined he’d suffered injuries to his head consistent with abuse.

View KFOR’s original story. 

See the images of the boy’s injuries. 

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