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Update: Midwest City business owner dragging his feet

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UPDATE: New details involving a Midwest City business owner accused of taking insurance money for roof damage, but failing to complete the job.

Now there’s big news for one customer.

Wes Davis has 6,685 reasons to smile.

The In Your Corner team helped negotiate a full refund for Wes.

You'll remember the homeowner was fed up with U.S. House Craft Roofing and its owner, Rich Hanks.

He refunded Wes his insurance money, but the contractor's problems aren't over there.

His roofing license is still suspended.

Plus he and his company are now under investigation by the Oklahoma Insurance Department for allegedly negotiating Wes' insurance claim without a public adjuster's license.

The Insurance Department tells the In Your Corner team it “took immediate action against Hanks' public adjuster license due to the severity of harm to the public."

An agency spokesperson wouldn't go into any more details, but says the state's investigation is ongoing.

Wes, whose home is for sale, can finally repair his roof once and for all.

 

OKLA. CITY - Wes Davis says he’s been waiting seven long months to get his new roof.

“I'm afraid of losing my money and not getting my roof done,” he says.

Davis complaint is with U.S. House Craft Roofing.

One of its salesmen was selling roofs door to door.

Wes says, “I wouldn't have to pay a deductible and they would deal directly with my insurance company so I wouldn't have to do a thing.”

The salesman had Wes sign a second contract with a different company, U.S. House Claim Services, essentially giving that second company permission to negotiate the claim with the insurance company on Wes' behalf.

“They told me they work with a public adjuster closely to make sure I'm taken care of,” Wes says.

There are a couple problems here.

We checked with the state insurance department and its legal counsel.

U.S. House Claim Services and its owner couldn't negotiate on Wes' behalf or any customer for that matter because they didn't have a license to do so.

There’s more.

Both companies are run by the same person, Rich Hanks.

Julie Meaders, an attorney with the Oklahoma Insurance Department, says state law prohibits a roofing contractor from serving as both contractor and public adjuster on the same roof deal.

She says, “They can meet with the adjuster for the company, point out damage, point out more damage than the adjuster saw in the first place, but the distinction is legally they are not supposed to be negotiating claims on behalf of the homeowner.”

Hanks refused to go on-camera with us, but says he is a licensed public adjuster now and claims he can negotiate a claim on behalf of a customer as long as he isn't charging a public adjuster's fee, which again, the state says is illegal.

We know Hanks and his roofing company recently had their license yanked by another state agency, the CIB, Construction Industries Board. That agency regulates roofers.

Jan Hubbard serves as the chief administrator for the CIB.

She says when a roofer's license gets suspended that roofer is required to notify customers about their suspension, which Wes says Hanks failed to do.

“And then let the property owner decide whether or not they want to continue under the arrangements,” Hubbard says.

Wes is trying to sell his house.

He wants out of the agreement and a full refund from the roofing company.

Hanks agrees a refund is in order and we'll let you know just as soon as Wes gets his money.

The In Your Corner bottom line:

  • Make sure a contractor is licensed and insured.
  • The same goes for public adjusters.
  • You can find out which ones are in good standing with the state by heading to our website.
  • Verify Insurance Agent (or) Public Adjuster License