Update: Oklahoma health officials say patient evaluated for Ebola, tests negative

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Ebola virus

UPDATE:  11/01/14

The patient in Tulsa testing positive for malaria and being monitored for Ebola has tested negative for the second illness.

The CDC tested the patients blood and released the negative results Saturday.

The patient will continue to be monitored for the required 21 day isolation person in accordance with the CDC guidelines.

 

 

TULSA, Okla. – The Oklahoma State Department of Health (OSDH) and Tulsa Health Department (THD) report say a patient being monitored in Tulsa, Okla. for Ebola tested positive for Malaria.

Another test is pending at the Oklahoma State Public Health Laboratory and will be completed later today.

The patient was being monitored by health officials because he recently traveled from West Africa, and alerted the Tulsa Health Department they had developed a fever.

THD immediately implemented an isolation and clinical evaluation plan.

Health officials say the patient was low risk for contracting Ebola, because the individual did not report any known exposure to persons with Ebola nor did the individual provide healthcare to an Ebola patient while in Africa.

A blood specimen was collected and will be sent to CDC for Ebola testing.

 

READ ORIGINAL STORY:

TULSA, Okla. – Officials in Tulsa say they are monitoring a patient for Ebola.

The Tulsa Health Department confirmed they are monitoring a patient in Tulsa County for the Ebola virus.

Officials say the patient recently traveled from West Africa.

At this time, the patient is classified as low risk, which means the person has traveled to Guinea, Liberia or Sierra Leone within the previous 21 days, but did not have any known exposure to Ebola.

According to THD, the individual notified health officials late Thursday evening that they had developed a fever.

They were taken to a hospital for evaluation.

This is a developing story. Check back for updates.

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