New proposed ordinance for cyclists causing debate

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OKLAHOMA CITY,Okla.-- You may have seen cyclists zipping through traffic during a red light, but a new city ordinance could soon make that illegal.

Some think cyclists should stay off road, but the cyclists beg to be treated equally by motorists.

"Most of us that commute on our bicycles, exercise on our bicycles, ride on the road, we do follow strict laws," Steve Swanson, General Manager at Schlegel's Bicycles said.

The laws are about to get even more strict if a new Oklahoma City ordinance passes.

Cyclists will no longer be able to pass between lanes of traffic traveling in the same direction, and they will be forced to keep a distance of at least three feet away from a car at all times.

"It's a little redundant that it adds another layer to a law that's already been there and it's open to a lot of misinterpretation," Swanson said.

Law makers say the changes are intended to keep everyone safe, but some think it will just create problems.

"What I'm afraid of is a car is going to come by me and not give me three feet and say 'you have to give me three feet,' well that's not how it's supposed to work," Swanson said.

Others say laws are just part of life.

"Two days ago, I was hit by a car and it was kind of scary, there's nothing you can do about it," Evan Bybee, an avid cyclist says.

He hopes laws like this will make things safer.

"If you're a cyclist and follow all the rules of the road, it's not a problem at all. It's a non-issue really," Bybee said.

No matter what side of the debate you stand on, it's clear all sides want to avoid seeing memorials on the side of the road.

Days before the changes were presented, the ordinance would have forced cyclists to only ride on the very right hand side of the lane. That language was taken out.

The council will vote on the new changes January 27th.

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