It’s a family tradition; International Finals Rodeo is in OKC

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OKLAHOMA CITY – Spur Lacasse is carrying on a family legacy in the world of rodeo.

Lacasse, a 21-year-old bareback rider from Mirabel, Quebec, won Friday’s opening round of International Finals Rodeo 45, spurring Hampton Rodeo’s Black Water for 79.75 points, collecting $1,792 in the process.

That’s pretty good for a first-time IFR qualifier. His father, Roger Lacasse was a 2012 inductee to the Canadian Professional Rodeo Hall of Fame and owns two Canadian championships. Roger has qualified for the IFR numerous times over a storied career.

“Since I was a kid, I’ve loved rodeo more than anything,” the younger Lacasse said. “When I was 16 years old, I told my dad I wanted to try; he was a little surprised. I got on some ponies the first year and just went from there.”

It worked. He’s found great success already, earning his inaugural IFR qualification by finding success at the International Professional Rodeo Association’s Canadian Finals in May, where he finished second, and winning the title at St. Tite, Quebec, the IPRA’s largest regular-season rodeo.

“That’s what got me here,” Lacasse said, who rode the snappy bucking horse with the classic spur stroke to claim the first-round title. “Any winning is great, especially starting off the first round. It helps you get started and hopefully carry it over to the rest of the finals.”

It’s especially pleasing at the International Finals. There are 25 Canadians and one Australian competing in Oklahoma City. They all earned the right to be at the IFR by how well they did on the rodeo circuit, traveling all across North America.

They’ll continue through the rest of the weekend, with the final three rounds taking place at 1:30 and 7:30 p.m. Saturday and 1:30 p.m. Sunday.

“I actually love traveling, getting to see things a lot of people don’t get to see,” Lacasse said. “To me, it’s the best way of living. We do it for the adrenaline rush, but it’s also a lifestyle.”

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