Oklahoma pastor believes proposal to outlaw hoodies could take racial profiling to whole new level

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OKLAHOMA CITY -  An Oklahoma lawmaker has proposed a law that could make it illegal to wear a hood in public.

Sunday, a number of members and church pastors at The Christ Experience celebrated their freedom by putting their hoods up during services.

The original bill states that it's illegal for anyone to wear a mask, hood or covering while committing a crime.

Now, a proposal for an amendment to that law, could make it illegal to hide your identity in public. The fine for your fashion crime? $500.

Pastor Semaj Vanzant agrees that some criminals do wear "hoodies," but says they're not the only ones.

"Criminals use hoodies, you know it's easy, but my wife uses hoodies because it's easy to put on her head when it's raining outside," Vanzant said.

The pastor believes this law came into play, "so that black people or brown people can be discriminated against when they wear hoodies."

If the law is passed, Vanzant says the floodgates will open up.

"They will start profiling in all types of ways for all different people," Vanzant said.

He warns that the storm coming will have all Oklahomans searching for something to cover their head.

"I'm pretty sure that there are more people than those that are gathered here at this church, more people than ones that look like me, that do not want this law or this proposal put into action. Whatever way we can voice our voice and make our statements, we will do so in an effort to make sure this type of law or proposal does not end up in the books of Oklahoma State," Vanzant said.

MORE: Wearing your hoodie in public could soon cost you up to a $500 fine

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