American man talks about being among 100 finalists picked for one-way trip to Mars

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BELLEVUE, Wash. – An American man recently spoke about what it is like being one of the finalists picked for a one-way trip to Mars.

A Dutch non-profit foundation is working to establish a colony on the red planet using today’s existing technology.

A 28-year-old programmer at Microsoft is one of 100 people who may be a little closer to a one-way ticket to Mars.

Carl LeCompte says while he is excited about the possible trip, his family is not as enthused.

“They’re proud of me but they’re fairly adamant in not wanting me to go because, to them, it’s kind of like me dying,” Carl LeCompte told KING. “Even if I don’t actually die, they’ll never see me again.”

LeCompte was one of more than 200,000 people to apply for the Mars One mission.  Two dozen of those applicants could start leaving earth in 2024, the group said in a statement.

According to KING, the plans are to have a crew of four people make the initial trip to Mars with new crews arriving every two years.

“I want to go there and actually build a home,” he said. “Adventure is certainly a part of it, but it’s not about the adventure. It’s not about leaving earth. It’s about going to a new place and settling there and living there and … integrating your lives into it and making a home out of it.”

LeCompte says he would feel like a pioneer making his home somewhere else.

“It’s sort of like a species growing up,” LeCompte said. “They always say Earth is the cradle of life. Right? Maybe it’s time to leave the cradle.”

The journey itself is expected to take around seven months, and a recent MIT study found that, should the first explorers succeed in landing, using current technology they would likely survive just 68 days.

 

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