Closings and delays list

“No one wants to see an innocent man die,” Final plea made for death row inmate’s life

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OKLAHOMA CITY - An Oklahoma death row inmate is gaining new support in his fight to live.

“I want people to know I didn't kill this man. I didn't participate or plan anything to do with this crime," said Richard Glossip in an interview earlier this year.

Glossip was convicted in connection with the murder of Barry Van Treese.

Van Treese was found dead at an Oklahoma City motel back in 1997.

Despite that conviction, Glossip has always maintained his innocence.

Prosecutors said Glossip hired maintenance worker, Justin Sneed, to take a baseball bat and bludgeon their boss, Barry Van Treese, to death because Glossip thought he would be fired. At trial, Sneed testified that he killed Van Treese at Glossip’s behest and received a life sentence. Glossip was sentenced to death.

Glossip appealed the sentence, but he has since exhausted all of his options.

He is scheduled to die on Sept. 16.

On Monday, a group spoke out for him, saying new flaws have been discovered in Glossip's case.

They believe those flaws could spare his life and one person may hold the key to his freedom.

While this group is supporting Glossip, they stopped often to point out they do not want to disrespect the family of Barry Van Treese, the victim in the case.

While they acknowledge the pain that family has dealt with, they say killing an innocent man is not the way to take that pain away.

“No one wants to see an innocent man die at the hands of the state,” said Donald Knight, an attorney.

But that’s exactly what Knight and a group against the death penalty believes is about to happen.

Knight is an attorney from Colorado who was alerted to the case by Sister Helen Prejean, a well-known death penalty opponent.

“After looking at the case and the facts of the case, I had to say, you know, Richard Glossip is innocent. He didn't do this. There isn't enough evidence,” Knight said.

Knight says he has found there are major flaws in the case against Richard Glossip.

“How uncertain the evidence is and yet a decision to pursue the death penalty was made and carried out,” he said.

He says after reviewing the case, it is obvious Glossip was not well represented.

He says the public defenders did the best they could, but that they did not have the necessary funding to really investigate and build a good defense.

Knight says on the night of Barry Van Treese's murder, there were too many unsavory characters at the motel, including a man who had been convicted of a very similar crime in Arkansas.

He says the case was solely based on the testimony of a man more concerned about saving his own life.

Justin Sneed was convicted as the one to have actually killed Barry Van Treese, but Sneed testified that Glossip hired him, saying he was the mastermind.

It's a story Don Knight says has several holes in it and has changed numerous times.

With just 65 days left until Glossip’s execution, there is very little chance he will live.

“He is going to be killed. The chances are overwhelming,” said Sister Prejean.

That is unless someone comes forward with new information, information they believe is out there.

Specifically, Don Knight and those working with him on the case are searching for Justin Sneed's daughter.

Knight says they believe she has information, which she tried to give to the clemency board, that could prove Glossip's innocence. That information was never considered because it arrived to the clemency board after Glossip's hearing.

To read more about their fight for Richard Glossip, visit the group's website.

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