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Six New Members Inducted into Oklahoma Sports Hall of Fame

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The Oklahoma Sports Hall of Fame welcomed six new members on Monday, August 3, as the class of 2015 was inducted.

Former OU football stars Kurt Burris and Steve Zabel, former OSU wrestlers Pat Smith and Yojiro Uetake Obata, along with former AAU basketball star Jack McCracken, and former baseball pitcher Ralph Terry were inducted into the hall.

Baseball Hall of Famer Johnny Bench was also honored with the Lifetime Achievement Award, the ninth recepient of the honor.

Bench was inducted into the Oklahoma Sports Hall of Fame in 1990.

McCracken and Burris were both inducted posthumously.

McCracken played for the legendary Henry Iba at Classen High School in Oklahoma City in the 1920s, before going on to a stellar career in AAU basketball, where he became an eight-time AAU All-American.

He was inducted into the Naismith Basketball Hall of Fame in 1962.

Burris was a consensus All-American for Oklahoma in 1954, when he finished second in the Heisman Trophy voting.   He was a two-time all-conference selection before playing five years in the Canadian Football League.

Steve Zabel was an All-American at tight end for Oklahoma in 1969, helping the Sooners to two Big Eight championships before playing 10 seasons in the National Football League.

Ralph Terry pitched 12 seasons in Major League Baseball, mostly with the New York Yankees.   He helped the Yanks win two World Series, and was the World Series MVP in 1962.

Pat Smith was the first wrestler to win four individual NCAA championships, achieving the feat in 1994, continuing the family legacy of wrestling success following his older brothers Lee Roy and John.

Yojiro Uetake Obata won three NCAA individual titles, was a two-time outstanding wrestler at the NCAA Championships, and won Olympic gold medals in 1964 and 1968.

 

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