Winter outlook circulating on social media may not be telling the truth

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OKLAHOMA CITY - Many social media users are not ready to trade in the heat for the cold after a post on Facebook began making the rounds.

The post has been circulating all over, claiming Oklahoma will be getting more snowfall than normal.

It has some very excited and others groaning in hopes it's not true.

The map places Oklahoma in line for above average snowfall this winter, but meteorologists say it's a little early to predict what will happen in the coming months.

“I would say the winter forecast can go just like the tornado season can go. It can be a mild tornado season but one tornado in the wrong place at the wrong time makes it a bad season. One big winter storm can make it a bad winter,” said KFOR Chief Meteorologist Mike Morgan.

In fact, the National Weather Service found that the map that goes along with the post is actually linked to a hoax post from a year ago.

Experts say it has once again found its way to social media.

“People are really interested in weather information and, especially around here, weather is part of our lives and sometimes people don't pay attention to the source of that forecast,” said Rick Smith, with the National Weather Service.

“A big weather headline on social media will always grab the attention of social media and sometimes it can roll and go gang busters,” Morgan said.

Be cautious of the source and remember just because something has been shared over and over again doesn't mean it's true.

 “Anybody with power point can make a fancy, very official looking forecast map,” Smith said.

What can we expect this winter? Well, Mike Morgan says this year's El Nino pattern could produce some significant snowfall but it's a little early to accurately make that prediction.

Remember you can always get the latest weather information on NewsChannel 4, on KFOR.com or through the 4WarnMe app.

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