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Grassroots organization wants Oklahomans to ‘green the vote,’ legalize medical marijuana

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OKLAHOMA CITY - Legalizing medical marijuana in Oklahoma could be on the ballot next year.

The use of cannabis oil was legalized in our state, but this group says that doesn't go far enough.

They want all forms of medical marijuana legalized in Oklahoma.

Folks from "Green The Vote" showed up at the Oklahoma State Capitol on Friday afternoon to turn in their petition.

“We've got to make this happen now. We can't wait on our lawmakers to make this happen, we need this medication now,” Isaac Caviness said.

Isaac Caviness and Joshua Lewelling wrote the petition.

In Oklahoma, citizens can bring an initiative to the voters if they have enough signatures on their petition.

“I have friends and family who suffer from things like ALS, friends who suffer from seizures. This is very important, this is proven to help those conditions,” Lewelling said.

They’re proposing an amendment to the Oklahoma Constitution that would allow Oklahomans to legally use, possess and cultivate cannabis for their medical needs with their doctor’s recommendation.

It would also allow for cannabis dispensaries, like in Colorado.

“We’re not talking recreational, there's not going to be people running up and down the streets crazy with a joint in their hand, that's not going to happen. This is medical, it takes a doctor's recommendation to do this,” Lewelling said.

Under their plan, the medical cannabis would be taxed, and they want the majority of the money to go toward the Department of Education.

With the petition approved, they now have 90 days to collect a little more than 123,000 verified signatures.

“It's blown my mind that it hasn't been done yet,” Lewelling said.

Gov. Fallin and many state lawmakers have shown strong opposition to legalizing marijuana.

In April, Katie’s Law was passed, allowing clinical trials for cannabis oil.

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